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How Does a Contractor Claim For An Extension of Time?

by | Jul 12, 2018 | Contractors All Risk |

A Contractor can claim for an extension of time, thus extending the Due Completion Date for a project. He can also claim for any costs which will increase due to being on site for longer (called time-related General Items).

 

Examples of events where an extension of time may be granted:

  • The Engineer increases the amount of work to be done, or the nature of the work to be done changes
  • Climatic conditions are abnormal
  • The Contractor is not given access to the site
  • Drawings are given late
  • Changes are made to drawings
  • Strikes which the Contractor cannot control
  • The Employer or Engineer suspends work
  • Other contractors employed by the Employer cause the Contractor to be delayed
How Does a Contractor Claim For An Extension of Time?

When the Contractor has a claim, he must notify the Engineer in writing, within 28 days of the cause arising and he must state:

  • What the cause of the claim is
  • If claiming an extension of time, how much time is being claimed and how it has been calculated
  • What additional payment is claimed and how this has been calculated.

When the cause of the claim is continuing, the Contractor must give updated details to the Engineer each month and final details within 28 days after the cause of the claim has ended.

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